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One of Mexico’s most important religious festivals is celebrated on All Saint’s Day on 1st November and All Soul’s Day the following day.

Dia de los Muertos, sometimes called Dia de los Fieles Difuntos is known in English as Day of the Dead.  Traditionally, November 1st honours deceased children and November 2nd honours deceased adults.

Day of the Dead is celebrated passionately throughout Mexico, and especially so in smaller provincial towns and cities.  November 2nd is an official Public Holiday in Mexico.

Far from being a morbid event, Day of Dead emphasizes remembrance of past lives and celebration of the continuity of life.  This acknowledgement of life’s continuity has roots which go back to some of Mexico’s oldest civilizations including the Olmec, Zapotec, Maya, and Purépecha.  The Aztecs also celebrated Day of the Dead, although not on the same day as we do today.

Dressing up as skeletons is part of the fun. People of all ages have their faces artfully painted to resemble skulls, and, mimicking the calavera Catrina (the elegant skull), they don suits and fancy dresses. Many revellers wear shells or other noisemakers to increase the excitement—and also possibly to rouse the dead and keep them close during the fun.

Pátzcuaro and Oaxaca are two of the most popular towns to celebrate, with plenty of colour elsewhere too.

Attracting lots of visitors, celebrations in the colonial city of Oaxaca and the ancient highland town of Pátzcuaro are particularly “lively”, colourful and poignant.

To experience this amazing festival click here for a quotation to fly to Mexico.

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Mexico Celebrates Day of the Dead

23 October 2018

One of Mexico’s most important religious festivals is celebrated on All Saint’s Day on 1st November and All Soul’s Day the following day.

Dia de los Muertos, sometimes called Dia de los Fieles Difuntos is known in English as Day of the Dead.  Traditionally, November 1st honours deceased children and November 2nd honours deceased adults.

Day of the Dead is celebrated passionately throughout Mexico, and especially so in smaller provincial towns and cities.  November 2nd is an official Public Holiday in Mexico.

Far from being a morbid event, Day of Dead emphasizes remembrance of past lives and celebration of the continuity of life.  This acknowledgement of life’s continuity has roots which go back to some of Mexico’s oldest civilizations including the Olmec, Zapotec, Maya, and Purépecha.  The Aztecs also celebrated Day of the Dead, although not on the same day as we do today.

Dressing up as skeletons is part of the fun. People of all ages have their faces artfully painted to resemble skulls, and, mimicking the calavera Catrina (the elegant skull), they don suits and fancy dresses. Many revellers wear shells or other noisemakers to increase the excitement—and also possibly to rouse the dead and keep them close during the fun.

Pátzcuaro and Oaxaca are two of the most popular towns to celebrate, with plenty of colour elsewhere too.

Attracting lots of visitors, celebrations in the colonial city of Oaxaca and the ancient highland town of Pátzcuaro are particularly “lively”, colourful and poignant.

To experience this amazing festival click here for a quotation to fly to Mexico.

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